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Boning Types

I've been meaning to get up pictures and an explanation of different boning types ever since I first got the spiral steel a couple weeks ago. I'm definitely liking the spiral steel, particularly for the boning channels at my sides. I haven't used any curved boning channels, so the side-to-side flexibility hasn't been too much of an issue, but with blush dupioni corset, both the duct strapping and the flat spring steel bones at the sides got permanent kinks in them after a bit of wearing. (I can iron them flat again, but it's preferable that they not to that to begin with. I'm also not sure how the bending and unbending will affect the life of the bones.) I used the regular (thinner) flat steel on either side of the grommets, and a thicker white steel bone the next seam over. I might have used the thicker ones for the sides of the boning channels, but I didn't have many of the thicker ones. The lighter weight bones do seem a bit too thin for stabilizing the lacing, but so far it hasn't caused any problems; we'll see if that changes with extensive wear. I didn't use any duct strapping in my denim corset. The duct strapping isn't bad, but is definitely softer and more flexible than steel or cable ties, and more reactive to body heat. It's significantly thinner than the cable ties, though, and also quite easy to sew through. I haven't actually used the plastic meant-to-be-boning boning at all. I got way back, before I did the duct strapping thing.
My preference for corsets is definitely a combination of flat and spiral steel. For other boned bodicies or anything else that needed a bit of extra structure, duct strapping is excellent, though. While it seems too flimsy for corsets, it's easy to cut, doesn't upset my machine to sew through it, and isn't too thick; it's actually very versatile.
Boning Types: Boning types in my possession; the four to the left are plastic, and the four to the right are steel. From left to right: --a heavy duty cable tie (duct tie? the 15" 120lb kind.) (from the hardware store) --perforated duct strapping (it only comes with the little holes, I use a revolving hole punch to cut them bigger so that I can use the duct strapping to stabilize eyelet) (from the hardware store) --duct strapping, cut lengthwise --plastic boning (I think it was from Joann) --1/4-inch spiral steel from corsetmaking.com --1/4-inch white steel boning from corsetmaking.com --"extra-thick" 1/4-inch white steel boning from corsetmaking.com (no, your eyes aren't deceiving you, it really is wider than the other1/4 inch stuff, my ruler says 5/16ths of an inch) and --1/2-inch white steel boning from voguefabricstore.comBoning Types: Boning types in my possession; the four to the left are plastic, and the four to the right are steel.
From left to right:
--a heavy duty cable tie (duct tie? the 15" 120lb kind.) (from the hardware store)
--perforated duct strapping (it only comes with the little holes, I use a revolving hole punch to cut them bigger so that I can use the duct strapping to stabilize eyelet) (from the hardware store)
--duct strapping, cut lengthwise
--plastic boning (I think it was from Joann)
--1/4-inch spiral steel from corsetmaking.com
--1/4-inch white steel boning from corsetmaking.com
--"extra-thick" 1/4-inch white steel boning from corsetmaking.com (no, your eyes aren't deceiving you, it really is wider than the other1/4 inch stuff, my ruler says 5/16ths of an inch) and
--1/2-inch white steel boning from voguefabricstore.com
Boning Types  -- Thickness: Left to right, that's the plastic duct strapping, plastic boning from Joann, extra-thick "1/4inch" (actually 5/16ths of an inch) wide white steel boning from corsetmaking.com, a cable tie, regular 1/4" white steel boning (which actually is 1/4 inch wide) from corsetmaking.com, and spiral steel boning from corsetmaking.com. Unless you count the thickness of the casing of the plastic stuff from Joann, the cable tie is definitely the thickest.  The extra-thick spring steel isn't too far behind, but is much, much sturdier.  The spring steel is actually thinner than it looks in this picture.   I had trouble getting a good side-view photo.Boning Types -- Thickness: Left to right, that's the plastic duct strapping, plastic boning from Joann, extra-thick "1/4inch" (actually 5/16ths of an inch) wide white steel boning from corsetmaking.com, a cable tie, regular 1/4" white steel boning (which actually is 1/4 inch wide) from corsetmaking.com, and spiral steel boning from corsetmaking.com. Unless you count the thickness of the casing of the plastic stuff from Joann, the cable tie is definitely the thickest. The extra-thick spring steel isn't too far behind, but is much, much sturdier. The spring steel is actually thinner than it looks in this picture. I had trouble getting a good side-view photo.



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